Reflection & artifacts that demonstrate student outcomes

Me and my VL poster at CIT 2012

This was part of my capstone portfolio project in graduate school.

Description of Assignment

Reflection and artifacts that demonstrate student outcomes (or some other standards or proficiencies identified by the student and approved by faculty supervisor) were achieved:

  1. Effective interpreters able to work with a wide range of deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing clients communicating in a variety of settings and circumstances.
  2. Discerning consumers of current, credible research findings on translation, interpersonal communication, meaning transfer, professional aspects of interpreting and professional development.
  3. Critical observers of the factors that impact professional interpreter  decision-making from accepting a job to billing for the job.
  4. Committed leaders and capable researchers in the interpreting profession able to advance the profession beyond its current status and understanding within the communities they serve.
  5. Effective facilitators of adult learning environments designed to guide students in their development as interpreters, professionals, and life long learners.
  6. Discerning consumers of current, credible researching findings on adult education, curriculum design, assessment construction, lesson planning, and effective practices in the field of interpreter education.
  7. Leaders in interpreter education pre-service and in-service, providing innovative training that raises the bar of expectations and quality within the field of interpreting.

Outcome #1: Effective interpreters able to work with a wide range of deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing clients communicating in a variety of settings and circumstances
My first public interpreting job: Deaf Day at Sea World, July 1990

In my interpreting career since 1990, I have interpreted in almost every setting except the courtroom. I have even interpreted a few legal situations with experienced legal interpreting teams to guide me. I interpreted in VRS and VRI for seven years until 18 months ago when I began this master’s program. While studying interpreting and teaching interpreting with Western Oregon University, I have continued to interpret in a variety of settings including academic, conference, medical, social services, and vocational. For reasons of confidentiality, it is not possible to post evidence of this work, but I have continued to blog about my work on my blog, Daniel Greene’s TerpTransTwitter, and Google+.

My latest public interpreting job: Hearing in the Mesa 5K run for Justin Osmond, Shane Osmond, Mary & Merrill Osmond on November 17, 2012.
Outcome #2: Discerning consumers of current, credible research findings on translation, interpersonal communication, meaning transfer, professional aspects of interpreting and professional development

My work in this program has shown my consumption and comprehension of research on these topics. My work is also shown in the literature review in my thesis on vague language.

Also shown by the following required and recommended readings I assigned to students in Introduction to Interpreting, some of which included my considered responses to other authors:

I even wrote some blog entries during the course that synthesized current research and changes in the profession:

Outcome #3: Critical observers of the factors that impact professional interpreter decision-making from accepting a job to billing for the job

During my teaching practicum course, I taught a unit in an ethics and professionalism course in Western Oregon University’s BA in interpreting program. I designed the unit to teach ethical decision-making in stating qualifications, accepting a job, and getting to the job. I gave students an example by sharing with them a link to my interpreting résumé and asking them to post basic credentials or a résumé. I also posted discussion boards on Moodle with job offers that were modeled after actual emails I had received from interpreting agencies with details changed to preserve confidentiality. I had the students in the class respond with questions about information they needed to know to accept the job. Once a student accepted a job, I posted responses based on job information emails I have gotten from interpreting agencies I work with. Finally, I created an ethical scenario video with colleagues Stacey Rainey and Erin Trine.

Outcome #4: Committed leaders and capable researchers in the interpreting profession able to advance the profession beyond its current status and understanding within the communities they serve

As shown by this poster session I presented at the Conference of Interpreter Trainers in October 2012:

Me and my VL poster at CIT 2012
Me and my VL poster at CIT 2012 – Vague Language: The value of teaching vague language to interpreting students
Poster Pages
Mind map: What you might know about Vague Language
ASLLRP DAI screenshot
ASLLRP Database Access Interface (DAI) screenshot that shows how I searched for various signs, gestures, participants, and stories
Screenshot of a full gloss of a sentence in the ASLLRP DAI
Screenshot of ASLLRP Sign Video example
Top 21 Vague Terms bar chart
Top 9 Vague Categories pie chart
Outcome #5: Effective facilitators of adult learning environments designed to guide students in their development as interpreters, professionals, and life long learners

As shown by this voiced-over video presentation I made for the students in my Introduction to Interpreting class at Phoenix College:

Outcome #6: Discerning consumers of current, credible researching findings on adult education, curriculum design, assessment construction, lesson planning, and effective practices in the field of interpreter education

As shown by my Lesson Plan on Certification and Professional Organizations:

Outcome #7: Leaders in interpreter education pre-service and in-service, providing innovative training that raises the bar of expectations and quality within the field of interpreting

As shown by my work in my student teaching position in the Introduction to Interpreting class at Phoenix College and these two workshops I taught as an invited lecturer in Minneapolis in November 2012:

I also pioneered using Google+ Hangouts to teach a workshop.

Author: Daniel Greene

I facilitate communication between Deaf and hearing people, and I teach people American Sign Language (ASL) and interpreting. Apart from doing the work I love, my greatest joys are family & friends, entertainment, food, photography, and travel.