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A puzzle in the time of coronavirus

A jigsaw puzzle we completed of George Seurat’s Un dimanche après-midi à l’Île de la Grande Jatte

My partner & I started this puzzle Monday evening and just finished it this afternoon. Talk about spending Sunday in the park with George! I saw the original painting, Un dimanche après-midi à l’Île de la Grande Jatte (A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte), hanging in the Art Institute of Chicago in 1993. It is huge, about 3:2 meters (about 10×7 feet), and I spent some time in the museum marveling at it. I’ve heard, seen, and sung Stephen Sondheim’s musical Sunday in the Park with George based on this painting, so it has added significance to me. This gave us something entertaining to do indoors on hot summer days during the coronavirus epidemic.

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Signed songs may be the appetizer, but ASL poetry is the dessert

In the spirit of saying Hey! Look at Deaf language artists! I’d like to share with you a Facebook Page I was turned on to today called ASL 1–10 Stories. 1–10 stories are a genre of ASL poetry using sign/classifier “rhymes” of the handshapes for the numbers 1 through 10. You have to learn to understand ASL on a sophisticated level to appreciate these stories, and I’ve never seen hearing people do them as well as Deaf people, so I like to think of it this way: if Paul & Tina are your appetizer, learn ASL from Deaf people so you can enjoy ASL poetry for dessert!

Katherine Dreier, The Société Anonyme Museum of Modern Art, & Yale University, 1941

Katherine Dreier, a co-founder in 1920 of The Société Anonyme Museum of Modern Art, gave an ethical legacy to my great-grandmother and a cultural legacy to the United States. The year Dreier deeded her collection to Yale University –1941 — she also wrote to my great-grandmother Ruth Seely Preston. In her letter, she enclosed an announcement by The Société Anonyme of giving their collection of modern art to Yale University. She also enclosed a Bulletin of the Associates in Fine Arts at Yale University showing and describing pieces from the collection. Most important to my family, she enclosed a personal statement certifying my great-grandmother’s birth, for that was what Ruth had written Dreier to request. Of the enclosed documents, Dreier wrote: “These you can show to the authorities if necessary to show them my standing in the community.” Since I found these documents among my grandmother’s memoirs, I have scanned and uploaded them in the interest of historical preservation. Here they are:

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