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Tried literally cutting and pasting

Printed and cut sections of my long syllabus, taped together

I was having such a hard time ordering the sections of my syllabus on the computer because I just couldn’t see the whole picture. I decided to do something I’ve never done before— print the document, use scissors to cut the sheets of paper into sections according to headings, move the sections around as seemed logical, and tape them together. I then took these sheets of paper back to the computer and cut and pasted the screen text into the order of the printed text. Even ordering the sections physically was agonizing for this indecisive perfectionist, but at least seeing them in real life I was able to see them all at once and organize them. Cutting and pasting on the computer was even more busy work, but at least I had a reference to help keep everything in line. Would I do it again? Probably.

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Thirteen years on WordPress

Happy anniversary with WordPress.com! You registered with WordPress.com 13 years ago. Thanks for flying with us. Keep up the good blogging.
“Happy anniversary with WordPress.com! You registered with WordPress.com 13 years ago. Thanks for flying with us. Keep up the good blogging.”

I have been off-and-on with blogging over the years, but I’m really happy I turned my 10-year-old website into a blog in 2006 and have kept it up all these years. WordPress has definitely made it easier to publish new content on DanielGreene.com.

Readership distribution map

Would like to hear from people who read my thesis

In the four years since my master’s thesis was published by Western Oregon University on Digital Commons, it has been downloaded 2,036 times. Oddly, though, I have not heard from readers or seen it cited. What strange times we live in! If you read my thesis, please email me@danielgreene.com or leave a comment to let me know how you used it in your research and/or practice. Thanks!

Readership distribution map
World map showing all the times my thesis was downloaded in different parts of the world in the four years since it was published online

Blog 2014: Free WordPress themes that display bylines

This is an update to a post I wrote in September 2012 titled WordPress.com themes that display author bylines, which listed free WordPress themes of 2012 that displayed bylines on both posts pages and single posts, single posts only, or not at all. My 2012 post served as an update to another blogger’s post Author and profile displayed or not (Panos, 2009; 2011). This present post covers all free WordPress Themes for Blogs at WordPress.com from January 2012 through July 2014.

Byline Displayed
Screenshot of a byline displaying in a post info/meta section

A matter of style

Displaying an author’s name is a matter of style, not content. As I wrote in WordPress themes not showing author bylines explained, the author’s byline is on every WordPress post and posts page. It is always there in the HTML; whether it is displayed or hidden is an effect of CSS that makes up the theme. It has no affect on search engine optimization (SEO) or Google Authorship.

Screenshot of hidden byline exposed by stripping CSS, courtesy of Josh, a WordPress Happiness Engineer
Screenshot of hidden byline exposed by stripping CSS, courtesy of Josh, a WordPress Happiness Engineer

A matter of preference

Some authors feel no need to have their bylines displayed except on single posts; for them, there are themes that hide bylines on posts pages. Others have multi-author blogs and want each author’s byline displayed everywhere. (Mind, I tested all these themes on my single-author blog.) Others, especially in organizational blogs, might want to present a more collective identity; for them, there are themes that hide bylines on all posts.

Here, then, is a list of free WordPress themes released from January 2012 through July 2014 that do and do not display bylines on single-author blogs: (more…)