Blog 2014: Free WordPress themes that display bylines

This is an update to a post I wrote in September 2012 titled WordPress.com themes that display author bylines, which listed free WordPress themes of 2012 that displayed bylines on both posts pages and single posts, single posts only, or not at all. My 2012 post served as an update to another blogger’s post Author and profile displayed or not (Panos, 2009; 2011). This present post covers all free WordPress Themes for Blogs at WordPress.com from January 2012 through July 2014.

Byline Displayed
Screenshot of a byline displaying in a post info/meta section

A matter of style

Displaying an author’s name is a matter of style, not content. As I wrote in WordPress themes not showing author bylines explained, the author’s byline is on every WordPress post and posts page. It is always there in the HTML; whether it is displayed or hidden is an effect of CSS that makes up the theme. It has no affect on search engine optimization (SEO) or Google Authorship.

Screenshot of hidden byline exposed by stripping CSS, courtesy of Josh, a WordPress Happiness Engineer
Screenshot of hidden byline exposed by stripping CSS, courtesy of Josh, a WordPress Happiness Engineer

A matter of preference

Some authors feel no need to have their bylines displayed except on single posts; for them, there are themes that hide bylines on posts pages. Others have multi-author blogs and want each author’s byline displayed everywhere. (Mind, I tested all these themes on my single-author blog.) Others, especially in organizational blogs, might want to present a more collective identity; for them, there are themes that hide bylines on all posts.

Here, then, is a list of free WordPress themes released from January 2012 through July 2014 that do and do not display bylines on single-author blogs: (more…)

Blog 2014: Adding social media links

Where I learned how to add social media buttons, and where I found them

Today, I added custom social media links to my secondary menu, which appears on the left sidebar in the Twenty-Fourteen WordPress theme I’m using now. I did this because Twenty-Fourteen doesn’t have social links in the theme, and I wanted them near the top of my blog layout. To learn how to add them, I started by reading the WordPress Support article “Add Social Media Buttons to Your Sidebar or Footer.” When I did a Google Image search of ‘free social media icons’, as suggested in the support article, I found my favorite icon set at GraphicsFuel: 20 Popular Social Media Icons (PSD & PNG). Thank you, GraphicsFuel!

What code I used

I used the HTML shown on the support article, but I amended it with a bit of CSS to put some padding (space) to the right and bottom of the buttons so they didn’t look stuck together. While I was at it, I took the width and height properties out of the HTML and put them into the CSS where they belong (since they are style, not structure). Here is a sample of the style code I added to the img element for my customization:

style="width:35px;height:35px;padding-right:5px;padding-bottom:5px;"

How it looks today

Of course things will change with time as I change themes or widgets, but here is what my blog looks like as of this writing, with the new social media button links I added to the left sidebar:

A screenshot of the front page of my blog on July 7, 2014
A screenshot of the front page of my blog on July 7, 2014

Why I wrote this

I always like to share what I learn with others who might benefit, and I like to give credit where it’s due. I hope you find it helpful. Please let me know.

Link

A cool site for designing color schemes

I recommend Work With Color’s Color Schemer to get complementary colors and multi-color palettes for blogs. To customize two of my blogs, I used the OS X color picker “eye dropper” to copy the color of an element of a blog’s default style and find out what the color’s hexadecimal code was. Then I entered the hex code it into this site, clicked some buttons, and it showed me color schemes to create a pleasing palette.

WordPress themes not showing author bylines explained

The other day, I expressed my concern on the WordPress Support Forums that my author bylines were gone from my posts in this blog using the Twenty Twelve theme. Today I got a response from staff explaining that, because of feedback from the WordPress community, they started using CSS (the style markup that composes the themes) to hide the author byline on some, but not all, themes. This makes the byline invisible in the normal, theme/CSS-enabled view, but if you view the page without the theme/CSS you will see the bylines.

Screenshot courtesy of Josh, a WordPress Happiness Engineer
Screenshot courtesy of Josh, a WordPress Happiness Engineer

This means the search engines can read the bylines and verify authorship. I checked this with Google’s Rich Snippet Testing Tool and found the search engine did, in fact, read my byline and verify my authorship. This is good to know!

For anyone who knows HTML and CSS and is curious, here is the HTML:

<span class="by-author"> by <a title="View all posts by Daniel Greene" href="https://danielgreene.com/author/danielgreene/" rel="author">Daniel Greene</a></span>

And here is the CSS that does the trick:

.by-author&nbsp;{display:&nbsp;none;}

If you are interested in viewing the code on your own blog, there are various ways to view source code.

WordPress.com themes that support post formats, WordAds, and bylines

I’ve been looking for a theme that will support my WordAds account, support post formats, and show my byline. As of this writing, only 57 out of 206 themes support post formats. Only 24 support post formats and WordAds. I wonder how many of those 24 show bylines. Let’s see: (more…)

WordPress.com photoblogging themes reviewed

When searching for a theme for my photography blog, I tried many different themes. I will not review every photoblogging theme WordPress makes, but here are my thoughts on the ones I tried:

  • AutoFocus is only good for posts with featured images, and even then the images are cropped in ways that make them unrecognizable. No post formats, I guess. No bylines on front and results pages, either.
  • Ideation & Intent is great for photoblogs, but not much else, because who wants to have a sidebar called Photos if you don’t have a lot of photos? It does show bylines on main navigation. It has no post formats, but if all you post is photos, that’s fine. Colorful and clean with the orange and blue text on white background, and very image rich. I love it for my photoblog.
  • Mixfolio is only good if you have featured images for every post; otherwise, you get a black rectangle that says “Featured Image Missing” on each preview on front and results pages.
  • Petite Melodies only looks good if you have featured images for every post. It shows no bylines in navigation page. It has no post formats.
  • Portfolio (a Premium theme) has all kinds of customization options, bylines, and no post formats.
  • Vintage camera has no bylines and no post formats.
  • Yoko shows no bylines in front page and results pages — except for on image and video posts! — but has post formats gallery, image, video, aside, link and quotes. I’m using it for my singing and signing blog, which is mostly videos.