Don’t let Internet video bulldogs bulldoze closed-captioning in the name of progress

President Barack Obama congratulating legislat...
President Barack Obama congratulating legislators and Stevie Wonder (Photo credit: theqspeaks)
Consumer Electronics Association CEO Gary Shap...
Consumer Electronics Association CEO Gary Shapiro introduces former Mass. Governor Mitt Romney (R) at CEA HQ in Arlington, VA. 5/28/2009 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Don’t let the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) and Entertainment Software Association (ESA) persuade the FCC to exempt them from closed-captioning Internet video. Read the article below and click the links to read the actual petition; then, write to the FCC to uphold the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) that President Obama signed into law.

Trade groups hunt for online-video exemptions from disability-access rules – FierceOnlineVideo.

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Author: Daniel Greene

I facilitate communication between Deaf and hearing people, and I teach people American Sign Language (ASL) and interpreting. Apart from doing the work I love, my greatest joys are family & friends, entertainment, food, photography, and travel.

4 thoughts on “Don’t let Internet video bulldogs bulldoze closed-captioning in the name of progress”

  1. The author of the article you link to got confused and conflated two things: Internet captioning and advanced communication services (which are basically Internet telephony, text0based messaging services, and videoconferencing services). The two petitions mentioned are about an exemption from the requirement to make advanced communication services accessible and have nothing to do with the captioning issue.

    CEA is not disputing the timeframe for closed captions on the Internet (only whether DVD and BluRay players must support closed captions). ESA has not been involved in the captioning issues at all, if I remember correctly (and a search in proceedings 11-154 comes up blank). However, there is another trade group called the Digital Media Association (DiMA), and *that* one wants to delay the timeframe for Internet captions. It is not mentioned in the article, though.

    To make matters even more intriguing, Google is a DiMA member, but refused to sign on to DiMA’s requests for a delay outright.

    Did I mention that the author of the article is confused?🙂

    In a nutshell, the proceedings to watch are:

    Captioning: 11-154
    Advanced Communication Services: 10-213, 96-198, and 10-145

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      1. I’ve been way too busy getting things done in this arena as part of my main job to be able to spend much time writing about it on the side. I wish I could, but there are only so many hours in a day. We’re spread pretty thin, to be honest.

        Are you coming to the NAD conference? If so, we could catch up. We’re doing a presentation on video quality and interoperability in video phones.

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        1. Thanks for asking. Unfortunately, no, not the NAD conference. I’m going to RID V this month and CIT in October. I should be too busy to blog, too, working on my master’s degree, but when I visited my blog one day and realized I hadn’t posted in five months, I freaked. I have to keep it up somehow.

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